Let’s get inoculated against the H1N1 virus

By Aaron Berhane November 2009 Immunization against swine flu or the H1N1 virus began in Canada at the end of October 2009. It is expected to confer t...

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By Aaron Berhane
November 2009

Immunization against swine flu or the H1N1 virus began in Canada at the end of October 2009. It is expected to confer the majority of people with immunity against the virus.

The H1N1 pandemic started in Canada about three months ago. As of last month, 79 deaths in Canada have been linked to the virus, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada. The federal government has imported 50.4 million doses of vaccine and has already distributed these to the provinces and territories. Pregnant women, the elderly and children are given priority in getting the vaccine and the rest of the population is next in line.

Some people are skeptical about the vaccine and wonder if enough time and testing went into producing it. They question if it can confer immunity against this new strain of virus. Others, on the other hand, assure us that the vaccine is of excellent quality as it has been made by a reputable company.

The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Public Health Agency of Canada recommend that the following groups of people get inoculated:
• People under 65 with chronic conditions
• Pregnant women
• Healthy children six months to under five years of age
• Persons residing in remote and isolated settings or communities
• Health care workers involved in pandemic response or the delivery of essential health care services
• Household contacts and care providers of persons at high risk who cannot be immunized or may not respond to vaccines
Everyone can get the H1N1 vaccine and help restrict the swine flu pandemic. But we each have to do what is right for us and make our own choices.

However, it’s always preferable that we get vaccinated soon because the vaccine takes about two weeks to develop immunization in our bodies. Therefore, we should rush to a vaccination center before it’s too late.

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